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New energies 03/08/2021

LECs: the many visions of autonomous energy systems

From powering communal EVs to new legal frameworks, a world tour of noteworthy news around Local Energy Communities.

From Australia to Italy, cities and towns are watching their various inhabitants work hand-in-hand to create their own autonomous energy infrastructure using solar panels and independent microgrids.

The Harmon’Yeu project is an ENGIE initiative that will make it the first renewable energy community in the country to store and share surplus energy between users within the grid

Families, governments and companies across the globe are actively seeking new ways to participate in the fight against climate change on a regional level, and one organizational structure is drawing in many of them.  (LEC).

Local Energy Communities, known as LECs, are becoming increasingly popular as groups of local actors — from individuals to small businesses — pool together the generating and sharing of renewable energy, saving money and diminishing harmful emissions.

From Australia to Italy, cities and towns are watching their various inhabitants work hand-in-hand to create their own autonomous energy infrastructure using solar panels and independent microgrids. Many of these international LECs are producing groundbreaking green energy management in their respective countries, yet no two look the same. From powering communal electric vehicles to operating under new legal frameworks, here is a selection of our favorite LECs around the world:       

  • FRANCE :  Cailar, a small southern commune, is leading the way for LECs in France with a new project called Smart Lou Quila facilitating the distribution of clean energy in the area. The country’s first LEC to recharge electric car batteries, the energy-sharing system is making local infrastructure smoother and more efficient: 

    Created by the start-up Beoga, the project provides energy to six families in a housing estate via photovoltaic panels installed on rooftops as well as to the wider community via a panel located on the municipal stadium.  

    The community members don’t just share energy — they also have two electric vehicles and three stationary batteries of 10 kWh. While one car is for police usage, the other is slated to be a common good accessible to all participants.    

    A smartphone app is used to manage production and consumption in real-time, while all users have their own electricity counter. Every user’s data is counted and shared within one system, so they can also see how much energy is produced and consumed by the other members of the community — and adapt their usage accordingly.